Geekbook 3.15 | Social + Design + Media

Welcome to Geekbook —  The Trove looks back at the past week or so, highlighting particular stories and articles, primarily from the digital media and online marketing & design industries, that have captured my attention and compelled me to read on. Subscribe here to receive Geekbook via e-mail.


  • When Did Twitter Grow Up: There have been several recent mainstream examples of how critical Twitter is becoming to brands’ marketing efforts. Using current events and popular culture as a launching pad, brands such as Oreo and even AARP are using Twitter to react to real-time events. By setting up brand newsrooms, companies are able to react to events as they happen, using Twitter’s inherent public broadcasting dynamics to reach audiences on the fly and circumvent the traditional advertising strategies. – Advertising Age
  • Newspapers That Are Owning It On Pinterest: Pinterest, which continues to grow in popularity, is breaking out from its early niche demographics and expanding into a site which businesses are using to generate revenue. Newspapers are now getting on-board and finding ways to use their images on the popular social media site. By creating images specifically for Pinterest and staying away from real-time news reporting, these are some examples of publications that are finding success on the platform. – Dream Local Digital
  • How Time Inc. Should Reinvent Itself as an Independent Publisher: As Time Warner spins off the magazine, Ad Age provides some advice on what they should do next to cut costs and remain viable. From embracing native ad formats, to jettisoning some of its smaller publications, to incorporating video and TV, it will be interesting to see how many of these recommendations are implemented and if they work. – Advertising Age
  • 10 Newspapers That Do It Right 2013: As newspapers struggle to stay in business, this story is an inspiring look at some success stories that could help direct the future for publishers. From retooling traditional insert advertising and front-page editorials, to e-books and community events, these stories gave me hope for the future of print. – Editor & Publisher

“Doing something halfheartedly will bring you half the results.” – Kirstin O’Donovan

(Images via Twitter)

Geekbook is produced by Jeff Howland, Community Manager at Dream Local Digital.

Tips, additions, or comments? E-mail me.

Follow Jeff on Twitter and Google+.

Facebook Announces Big Changes to News Feed

Today, Mark Zuckerberg and the crew at Facebook announced some fairly significant design changes to the news feed. Bringing bigger pictures, better filtering of stories, and a consistent mobile design, Facebook’s goal is to allow users to more easily focus on the stories they care about and make those stories richer and more engaging. The three key elements in the design changes are:

  • Rich Stories – The new design has a big focus on visuals, providing bigger pictures and videos, as well as providing more engagement by showing you who is sharing the content. Third party applications, such as Pinterest will have richer visuals in the feed as well.
  • Choice of Feed – To help users focus on the stories they want to see, several new feeds will be available. An ‘All Friends’ feed will allow users to see every single post from all of their friends in chronological order. A ‘Music Feed’ will allow users to see posts about the music they like, and a ‘Photo Feed’ will comprise all photos that users friends and pages post.

  • Mobile Consistency – Inspired by mobile design, the new look will be consistent across platforms, whether you’re on a laptop, tablet, or phone. With this new design Facebook is trying to “get Facebook out of the way and push the content to the front.” This mobile inspired approach provides a much cleaner, more modern feel.

The limited rollout starts today, hitting the website version first, then moving into mobile versions over the next couple of weeks. As with most releases, they will limit the rollout until they’ve had chance to get some user feedback and make adjustments.

What changes do you like (or dislike) the most?

This article was written by Jeff Howland, Community Manager at Dream Local Digital. Jeff grew up in Maine and has lived in the midcoast area for the last 13 years. Since graduating from the University of Maine with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering Technology, he has held positions within the industrial sector, as a software engineer, and the financial and marketing sectors, in a broad range of technology management and client support roles. Currently, Jeff is on the Boards of Directors for two local non-profit organizations in the public affairs and education sectors. As a Community Manager at Dream Local, Jeff works with businesses and non-profit organizations, managing social media networks, online and brand marketing, public relations, communications, and more, to ensure their online environments are consistent with and complementary to their traditional marketing and public relations strategies.When ‘unplugged’ Jeff likes to go for a run or sit down with a good book. Please contact Jeff at jeff@dreamlocal.com or connect online >> Twitter  LinkedIn  Google+.

Geekbook 3.1 | Trove Edition

Welcome to Geekbook —  The Trove looks back at the past week or so, highlighting particular stories and articles, primarily from the digital media and online marketing & design industries, that have captured my attention and compelled me to read on. Subscribe here to receive Geekbook via e-mail.


  • How Facebook’s Timeline Was Born: Get a peek into the Facebook ‘labs’ and listen as Nicholas Felton as he describes the creative process that went into Facebook’s Timeline. It’s amazing to hear him talk through the sequence of events from his creation of the idea to Facebook’s implementation of it. — Fast Company
  • Financial Times Editor on Digital Transition: As the newspapers and the rest of the media industry continue to work through major industry changes, this piece was particularly interesting. Lionel Barber, editor of the Financial Times talked with The Guardian about his plans to tackle this digital revolution. With a combination of a production changes, a strategic change of direction for the international editions, and staff cuts, he walks through his plans to get through it all. — The Guardian
  • The Unfair Stigmatization of Digital Notetaking: Up until about a year ago I still primarily used a notebook to take notes at meetings, etc. However, now I find myself bringing my Mac or iPad to meetings and taking notes directly in Google Docs or Evernote. I confess to chronic multitasking when taking notes this way, but is that fair these days? Alexandra Samuel provides her experiences and insights here. — Harvard Business Review
  • When Will the Internet Reach Its Limit: As the number of connected devices increases immensely from year to year, is there a point where the Internet will break? Larry Greenemeier at Scientific American looks at indicators that we’re reaching a limit,  and walks through some interesting (read: geeky) ways to increase its limits. This is a pertinent topic and it’s nice to know someone is thinking about a solution. — Scientific American
  • First the media gets disrupted, then comes the education industry: Being in the middle of the digital media revolution our focus tends to be on newspapers, publications, and media. However, Mathew Ingram’s story here looks at another area that is primed for disruption: education. In a conversation with Harvard business professor, Clay Christensen, he talks about how the availability of high-quality online learning could be a game-changer. Mathew provides links to other articles that dig into this topic even further. — GigaOm

(Images via Twitter, Fast Company, The Guardian, GigaOm, Don Skarpo)

Geekbook is produced by Jeff Howland, Community Manager at Dream Local Digital.

Tips, additions, or comments? E-mail me.

Follow Jeff on Twitter and Google+.